My Place (마이 플레이스)

My Place (마이 플레이스) – ★★★★☆

My Place (마이 플레이스)

My Place (마이 플레이스)

The best kinds of documentary are the ones where the audience and those within the film itself undertake the same journey of discovery, sharing revelations and introspections about a particular topic that ultimately change the perspectives of those both sides of the camera. This is acutely the case with director Park Moon-chil’s My Place, a highly personal account of the director’s own family history and trauma. Director Park explores the inherently Korean cultural clashes of traditional ideology versus the contemporary, Western individualism contrasted with Eastern collectivism, as well as gender and family politics, all through the microcosm of his own family unit. Beginning with very traditional concerns over his unmarried sister’s pregnancy, the documentary charts how every member of the Park family is forced to re-examine themselves, their pasts, and their choices in order to welcome the new member into the fold. From beginning to end My Place is a heartwarming and illuminating film, thanks in no small part to the director’s wonderfully strong and charismatic sister who challenges familial and cultural issues head-on and emerges victorious.

My Place (마이 플레이스)

Cross-cultural trauma and single motherhood are problematic topics in Korea

Director Park’s sister Peace is very much the heart and soul of My Place, and the documentary is largely centered around the ramifications of her decision to be a single mother. In Korean culture unwed mothers are heavily stigmatized, and the film begins by attempting to address her perceived irresponsibility and whether abortion is a viable option. Yet as director Park converses about the issue with his parents, he begins to re-evaluate his own understanding of his sisters character through considering their shared history, and by interviewing her about her past and the pregnancy. The technique is superb, as the non-judgmental approach allows for layers of psychology and past traumas to be re-examined, and how they impact the decisions of the present. For instance, the film explores how the siblings were born and raised in Toronto which allowed their individuality and creativity to be nurtured, yet their forced relocation back to Korea at a young age provided an enormous culture shock that was difficult to cope with; the director even noting that school assemblies reminded him of the Nazis. The impact was greatest on Peace however, and the home videos and photographs of her childhood authentically capture her fraught and difficult childhood.

Old home videos add authenticity to the journey the family undertake

Old home videos add authenticity to the journey the family undertake

Director Park also applies such frameworks to his mother and father, and in doing so discovers more about what drove them in their youth and what shaped their decision-making processes so long ago. With the revelations of Peace’s unhappy childhood it would be all too easy to blame his parents, and while they indeed acknowledge responsibility for their choices, delving into their history stops the issue from being simple. Such scenes are brilliantly edited within the documentary not only for their seamlessness, but the constantly compelling revelations regarding his parents inspires audience introspection. Each member of the Park household is a fascinating person forged by history, and the loving care that director Park exhibits when filming them is palpable. This particularly applies in regard to Peace, as the directors respect and admiration for his sister clearly grows and develops during the course of the film.

Ironically what forces the family to re-evaluate themselves is the very thing that causes them worry – Peace’s pregnancy. And when her son Soul is born, witnessing the family gathering together and become stronger than ever is extremely poignant. Director Park charts the very early years of Soul’s life in similarly effective style, exploring how each member attempts to find a role in which to provide help and support, and the results are consistently moving, humourous and entertaining. Watching Peace working hard as a single mother, and Soul as he develops a personality of his own, is powerfully absorbing and captured with tenderness and sensitivity. One such scene involves Soul and his grandfather reading a storybook together, and the attempt to bestow morality lessons on the youngster is a beautifully funny moment. Director Park – and the audience – come to realise that the initial concerns over Peace’s pregnancy were unfounded, and that the strength and resilience she exhibits as a single mother are incredibly admirable. As such, My Place is emblematic of changing cultural attitudes, and is a wonderful testament to the love and bonds shared within the family.

Family trauma is revisited and healed through the birth of Peace

Family trauma is revisited and healed through the birth of Peace

Verdict:

My Place is a funny, enlightening, and wonderful documentary about the importance of family. By using his unwed sisters pregnancy as a catalyst, director Park Moon-chil uses his concerns as a springboard in which to explore the history and psychology of his mother, father, and most predominantly his sister Peace. In doing so director Park shares his revelations and changing attitudes with the audience, with each step constantly compelling as the family attempt to heal past traumas in order to welcome the new baby. A superb and lovely documentary.

★★★★☆

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International Women's Film Festival in Seoul (서울국제여성영화제) Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Reviews
Sweet Temptation (잘 먹고 잘 사는 법)

Sweet Temptation (잘 먹고 잘 사는 법) – ★★★★☆

Sweet Temptation (잘 먹고 잘 사는 법)

Jeong-ho enjoys his diet of raw foods

At the 2013 Jeonju International Film Festival, Sweet Temptation (잘 먹고 잘 사는 법) had the distinction of walking away with the Grand Prize in the Korean Short Film Competition. It’s highly likely that the film will continue to do well on the festival circuit as director Jeong Han-Jin (정한진) has crafted a lovely tale about the bond between mother and son, and the role of food in maintaining and developing the relationship. Combined with the charming character study involving a young boy’s loyalty, as well as some very attractive cinematography, Sweet Temptation is an endearing and memorable short film. Jeong-ho lives alone with his mother and their bond grows ever stronger as they cultivate fruits and vegetables together, before returning home to prepare them for meals. Their life is seemingly idyllic, until a girl at school tempts Jeong-ho with an offer of chocolate. Conflicted between loyalty and desire, he must make a choice to decide what kind of person he wants to be.

Director Jeong wonderfully conveys the lives of Jeong-ho and his mother as they work on the allotments for produce. The vibrancy of the countryside articulates the happiness and warmth they feel when together as well as the satisfaction of eating the fruits and vegetables they’ve spent all day harvesting, which themselves are full of colour. The bright red tomatoes, pale green cucumbers, electric orange carrots and so on all combine to portray a high-spirited, and very healthy, satisfaction with their efforts. After such a heartwarming opening director Jeong then begins to slowly and gently peel back the layers from the seemingly idyllic lifestyle revealing it to be anything but simple. This subtlety is easily one of the greatest strengths of the film as Jeong-ho, while happy, is not content.

Han-jin is conflicted between being a good son and his desire for more

Jeong-ho is conflicted between being a good son and his desire for more

Jeong-ho’s school life is where Sweet Temptation really becomes a compelling film. In running around with other children and comparing food during lunch time, the young boy is actually somewhat of an outsider. Recognising this, a girl in his class takes pity on him and as they begin to forge a relationship Jeong-ho becomes ever more conflicted, as his new friend represents temptations that lead away from the teachings of his mother. The symbolic and innocent relationship is genuinely lovely and sincere, particularly as they attempt to educate each other on food. As such the ‘sweet temptation’ comes to mean not only the chocolate and promise of tasty meals, but also the desire for someone’s affection other than his mother, and watching Jeong-ho’s internal conflict unfold is a real highlight. The young actor portraying the character does an excellent job in conveying torn loyalties, and when placed in compromising situations his deeply sad and frustrated reactions are often palpable.

If there is criticism to be had, it comes in the form of the running time. Sweet Temptation is a consistently compelling short film, and director Jeong weaves some really interesting plot threads within the narrative that are never fully realised or explored. This is a real shame as these hints at a wider world and family history would undoubtedly be as equally fascinating with the director’s gentle stylisation. However, despite such drawbacks Sweet Temptation is a charming and endearing film and certainly warms the heart for a good deal after the final credits.

The bond between Han-jin and his single mother is wonderfully conveyed

The bond between Han-jin and his single mother is wonderfully conveyed

Verdict:

Sweet Temptation won the Grand Prize at the 2013 Jeonju Film Festival in the Korean Short Film category, and not without good reason. Director Jeong Han-Jin has produced a lovely and endearing story about the bond between mother and son, and temptations that forge internal conflict in innocent minds. While plot threads are not capitalised on due to the short running time, Sweet Temptation remains a charming and heart-warming film.

★★★★☆

Festival News Green Film Festival in Seoul (제10회 서울환경영화제) Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Korean Festivals 2013 Reviews
December (디셈버)

JIFF 2013: Quick Fire Reviews 5

Additional quick-fire reviews from the 14th Jeonju International Film Festival:

December (디셈버)

December (디셈버)

December (디셈버) – 6/10

The big winner at JIFF 2013 scoring the Grand Prize in the Korean Film Competition, December is a charming and raw exploration of the building of relationships. Structured in accordance with the months of the year, director Park Jeong-hoon (박정훈) uses the time frame to convey the burgeoning relationship between a female high school student and a male convenience store clerk, and how small moments are built into something more. The protagonists are highly compelling, particularly as the girl manipulates situations into bringing the two closer together such as buying sanitary towels in order to prove her ‘womanhood’. Yet December is also crucially missing an emotional core that stops empathy from evolving between the characters and the audience, something which greater character development would easily remedy. A compelling and interesting, although emotionally lacking, film.

My Place (마이 플레이스)

My Place (마이 플레이스)

My Place (마이 플레이스) – 9/10

My Place is everything a great documentary should be. The film is a wonderful and heart-filled love letter to family, one that takes an uncompromising look at wounds past and present in the forging of a person’s personality. Perhaps more surprisingly is that such a raw exploration is based on director Park Moon-chil’s (박문칠) own family, which lends further credibility and sincerity. As the documentary unfolds everyone – including director Park – changes and comes to understand each other with greater depth. The inclusion of the cultural, generational and gendered differences that have effected the family is brilliant, yet the real masterstroke comes from places the director’s sister Peace at the center of the film. As a single mum challenging every ideological form in her path, it is her character that makes for such compelling viewing. A must-watch film, recommended.

Remiges

Remiges

Remiges – 8/10

Japanese film Remiges, by writer/director Ozawa Masato, is a deeply poignant examination of youths who suffer from abusive parents. The fragile psychology of central protagonist Sayako is slowly conveyed throughout the course of the film, moving from simply being a bad kid to a complex, abused victim. While the teenager initially appears to be selfish and irresponsible, her actions are the ramifications of years of awful parenting. Director Masato employs non-linear editing in order to portray the torment Sayako suffered as a young child, and is far from contrived as each scene lends further information and empathy to her situation, giving credence to her anti-social behaviour. Symbolism is also used well throughout Remiges, including a parrot horrifically having it’s wings clipped, while Sayako’s plight is mirrored amongst the other characters she comes into contact with. A powerful and insightful film about youth.

Trunk (트렁크)

Trunk (트렁크)

Trunk (트렁크) – 5/10

Trunk is best thought of as a showcase for director Kim Hyeon-cheol’s (김현철) talents rather than a great piece of filmmaking. That’s not to say that it’s a bad film at all, as what is on display is a very competent approach to both the horror and thriller genres. Director Kim employs a host of stereotypical conventions in portraying the story of a woman whose curiosity gets the better of her when she spies an open trunk. To say more would involve spoilers, but tension is constructed well as the story progresses. Howver, the attempt to add an original spin doesn’t really work and comes off as silly, undermining the suspense generated prior. Trunk is a competent showcase, and it will be interesting to see what director Kim does next.

Festival News Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Korean Festivals 2013
The potent water symbolism runs throughout the film

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대) – ★★★☆☆

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대)

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대)

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대) was one of the big winners at the 14th Jeonju International Film Festival, scoring the CGV Movie COLLAGE Prize which includes 2 weeks of commercial release, a great boon for any independent film. The reasons for the victory are quite clear, as director Kang Jina (강진아) employs some truly lovely visual aesthetics in her exploration life, love and grief while utilising more traditional melodramatic conventions. Interestingly director Kang never lets the film become too ‘dark’ despite such weighty material, and as such it’s popularity with Korean audiences is entirely understandable. Yet Dear Dolphin is not perfect, featuring a haphazard narrative structure that creates distance between the audience and the central protagonists, while the creation of subplots that are later dropped is a source of frustration. However the story does well in examining the illogical sense of grief following the death of a loved one, and is a thought-provoking, attractive film.

Unable to come to terms with the death of his girlfriend Cha-kyeong (Han Ye-ri (한예리), physiotherapist Hyeok-geun (Lee Hee-joon (이희준) develops insomnia. Unable to work or function properly his life begins to fall apart, while his mental stability becomes strained due to hallucinations.  His grief and sense of guilt are also shared by Gi-ok (Lee Yeong-jin (이영진), Cha-kyeong’s best friend, who simultaneously hates herself for her involvement in the accident and also for secretly coveting Hyeok-geun. As their grief becomes ever greater, and reality and fantasy become difficult to separate, Gi-ok and Hyeok-geun must learn to overcome their emotional trauma lest it consumes them.

Hyeok-geun' begins to hallucinate due to his uncontrollable grief and insomnia

Hyeok-geun begins to hallucinate due to his uncontrollable grief and insomnia

Dear Dolphin excels when dealing with the subject matter of grief, and the variety of forms which it takes. The emotion is a problematic one to portray, yet director Kang succeeds in capturing the different complexity of each protagonist. Hyeok-geun’s internal strife is articulated through his continual self admonishment and his self-imposed alienation, while the insomnia inspired hallucinations of Cha-kyeong reveal his inability to accept her death. Gi-ok meanwhile cannot cope with the loneliness of her best friend’s passing, heightened by her guilt over desiring Hyeok-geun. Both characters blame themselves for not doing something – anything – to change the past, while Cha-kyeong’s family resent them for much the same reason. The emotional complexity of everyone involved is compelling throughout, as each person commits irrational acts without fully understanding why.

To stop the film from sinking beneath the increasingly fraught emotional tension, director Kang employs a non-linear structure that harks back to when the threesome were happy. The technique certainly brings levity to the story, as well as further conveying the sense of loss through the contrast between the past and present. Indeed, the director utilises her wonderful sense of colour and composition during the flashback sequences that feature vibrant warm reds and yellows, in complete opposition to the washed-out palette following Cha-kyeong’s death. Yet it also serves to usurp the character development in the here and now, as plot threads that took time to establish are often dumped only to later reappear, or to never return at all. The confusion that arises as a result of narrative jumping through time frames results in a distancing between the characters and the audience as it becomes difficult to fully engage and empathise with their respective situations. This is ultimately Dear Dolphin‘s downfall, as in a bid to keep the film ‘light’ with traditional melodramatic conventions, the powerful emotional resonance of each character becomes lost.

Beautiful, cherished memories of the threesome become like poison

Beautiful, cherished memories of the threesome become like poison

As empathy becomes increasingly diluted, it therefore falls to the actors to keep the emotional intensity sharp in the present. In this respect it is Lee Yeong-jin who gives the standout performance as Gi-ok, as the actress appears evermore fraught with guilt, stress and grief. The anguish on Gi-ok’s face as she reaches out to Hyeok-geun for emotional and physical support is sincere, while the continual rejection of her advances become heartbreaking as she sinks lower and lower. Lee Hee-joon and Han Ye-ri give competent performances as Hyeok-geun and Cha-kyeong, but they are lacking the chemistry and passion that are sorely required when exploring the death of a loved one. As such the film quickly becomes Gi-ok’s story as it is her emotional distress that is the most fully developed, and is her resolution rather than Hyeok-geun’s fragile mental state that takes precedence.

Luckily director Kang also injects the film with some stunning cinematography in relation to scenes involving Cha-kyeong and Hyeok-geun, particularly when employing the water symbolism that is so inherent to the narrative. The scenes are absolutely gorgeous and appear more like a painting than a film. Ironically the surreal and otherworldly sequences further complicate the narrative, but when scenes are this beautiful it’s hard to complain. Often accompanied by an ethereal soundtrack, the conveyance of water as a source of life, death, and even purgatory are lovely to behold, and it is these scenes that resonate long after the film and provide thought-provoking moments on the nature of loss.

The potent water symbolism runs throughout the film

The potent water symbolism runs throughout the film

Verdict:

One of the big winners at JIFF 2013, Dear Dolphin is a very attractive film that deals with the issues of love, loss, and grief. Director Kang Jina explores such weighty topics well by constructing the fragility of each protagonist as unique according to their psychology, but the decision to employ non-linear techniques dilutes the emotional intensity of the story. Yet with a great performance by Lee Yeong-jin, as well as some truly beautiful sequences involving potent water symbolism, Dear Dolphin is a thought-provoking film on the nature of life, death, and spirituality.

★★★☆☆

Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Reviews
The otherworldly landscapes are beautifully realised

Lebanon Emotion (레바논 감정) – ★★★★☆

Lebanon Emotion (레바논 감정)

Lebanon Emotion (레바논 감정)

Receiving its world premiere at the 2013 14th Jeonju International Film Festival, Lebanon Emotion (레바논 감정) quickly began to earn praise amongst audiences and critics alike. Director Jung Young-heon’s (정영헌) poignant tale of a man unable to come to terms with his mother’s death and a woman on the run is a wonderful dramatic thriller, featuring sincere and moving performances as the complex lives of the characters within become evermore intertwined. The director’s history as a cinematographer is also readily apparent throughout as the film contains some genuinely gorgeous visuals, which also serve to be deeply symbolic of the main protagonists. While a few plot holes and structural imbalances stop it from being a perfect film, with Lebanon Emotion director Jung has established himself as a Korean filmmaker to watch.

The central protagonist attempts to accept his mother's death

The central protagonist attempts to accept his mother’s death

Seeking solace at a friend’s country home, a man plans his suicide due to his inability to cope with his mother’s death. Yet while taking a stroll in the mountains he hears the scream of a woman who has stepped on a deer trap, and takes her home to nurse her back to health. As they become more acquainted the unlikely couple start to realize they share several things in common, while the kindness they experience from each other is unprecedented. Yet little do either of them know that the woman’s past is catching up to them in the form of her brutal gangster ex-boyfriend, and he is far from happy.

One of the great strengths of Lebanon Emotion are the themes that it explores through the central protagonists. The grief inhabited by the man is palpable, with his depression and insular mannerisms acutely alluding to his turmoil. His reconstruction of his mother’s death is heartbreakingly poignant, as are his breakdowns when faced with the reality of the situation. Similarly issues of survival are inherent to the woman’s struggle. Fresh out of prison and with nowhere to go, the strength and resilience that she employs are wonderfully conveyed without ever becoming cliche. The contrast between the characters is also a delightful reversal of traditional gendered roles, where the emotional/homestead and physical/drifter realms are exchanged. Such work could be so easily undermined when placing the two characters together, but luckily contrivances are rejected and in its place a complex relationship develops through the slow and natural discovery of each other’s personalities.

The arrival of the woman begins a chain of unexpected events

The arrival of the woman begins a chain of unexpected events

The otherworldly landscapes further serve as potent symbolism for the man and woman. The winter environments are stunning and drained of colour, and director Jung makes effective use of locations in regard to each character. While the lack of colour heightens the depression and emotional distress of the man, the snow covered land becomes a challenge for survival for the woman. The area surrounding the country home is a construction site, a place that initially embodies the dismantling of a life yet through the relationship that develops comes to convey the construction of one. Director Jung wisely makes use of each area, adding further surrealism with the inclusion of dream sequences that add even greater insight to not only the protagonists, but also as a comment on the meaning of life.

Yet Lebanon Emotion is not solely concerned with deep, existential issues. The inclusion of the woman’s ex-boyfriend adds incredible tension to the proceedings as he gets ever closer to discovering her location, placing her relationship with the man on a timer. The suspense and tension generated whenever the gangster is on screen is quite chilling, while the brutality that occurs is highly effective due to the threat rather than the action. The danger and impact of such violence on the lives of those involved makes the story continually compelling and engaging, and acts as an interesting debate on the nature of masculinity.

The otherworldly landscapes are beautifully realised

The otherworldly landscapes are beautifully realised

Verdict:

Lebanon Emotion is certainly one of the best films to emerge from the 2013 Jeonju International Film Festival. With an engrossing story involving the nature of grief, the challenges of survival, and the threat of external violence, the film never ceases to be compelling as two seemingly disparate people come together through suffering. Director Jung Young-heon’s keen visual sensibilities are stunningly realised through the lovely cinematography, making for an attractive and insightful film.

★★★★☆

Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Korean Festivals 2013 Reviews
Breathe Me (울게 하소서)

JIFF 2013: Quick Fire Reviews 4

Further quick fire reviews from the 14th Jeonju International Film Festival.

Breathe Me (울게 하소서)

Breathe Me (울게 하소서)

Breathe Me (울게 하소서) – ★★★★☆

Far too often, scandalous headlines of teen pregnancy and mothers abandoning their children in horrific ways fill Korean media. It’s therefore quite brave of director Han Eun-young (한은영) to produce a film about both issues in this 20 minute short, particularly as it is staged from the perspective of the teens themselves. The result is an incredibly engaging and compelling film, one that is so enthralling that it feels more like 5 minutes than the actual running time. As high school girl A-young has her baby in secret, director Han effectively uses the dim lighting and locations very well in constructing the loneliness and isolation of the situation, contrasted well with the panic and adrenaline-induced scenes of her boyfriend as he attempts to find her. Rather than provide excuses, director Han conveys how the fear of the situation leads the teens to make illogical choices that jeopardize them all. While more information about the central protagonists, and a longer running time, would have made Breathe Me a stronger short, the film is a powerful piece and one that is timely.

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대)

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대)

Dear Dolphin (환상속의 그대) – ★★★☆☆

Director Kang Ji-na’s (강진아) Dear Dolphin examines the grief, and the illogical sense of guilt, that follows the death of a loved one. Such weighty subject matter is given a sense of surrealism with the inclusion of water symbolism and hallucinations brought on by insomnia, as the narrative conveys how loving memories and emotions can become poison through the refusal of acceptance. For the most part director Kang succeeds in capturing the psychological devastation and the difficulty in moving on, yet the narrative structure is also responsible for lessening the poignancy of the message. As the story often jumps between time frames without much notice, as well as the stylistic changes and the picking up and dropping of subplots at whim, it becomes difficult to fully connect with the central protagonists and to feel their trauma. Perhaps this is intentional in order to keep the film ‘light’ despite the complex subject matter, but the result is one that distances audiences from the raw emotional power that the film attempts yet never fully manages to conceive. A thought-provoking film.

Festival News Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Korean Festivals 2013
Shibata and Nagao (시바타와 나가오)

JIFF 2013: Quick Fire Reviews 3

More quick fire reviews from the 14th Jeonju International Film Festival.

Inertia

Inertia

Inertia – 6/10

This Mexican hospital drama has an extremely heartfelt script, as the nature of love and sacrifice are explored. Central protagonist Lucia accidently runs into her ex-boyfriend Felipe who, thanks to failing kidneys, has momentary lapses in coherence. As she decides to take care of him the two discover feelings that they thought were long gone, yet Felipe’s increasingly volatile state causes further heartache. Director Isabel Munoz Cota competently helms the drama, yet there is always a distance between the audience and the characters, a critical issue for such an emotional story. Similarly the acting is also adequate, but the roles demand much more skill and nuance than what is provided. Inertia is a well-made film that doesn’t quite manage to fulfill the potential of the script.

Burn, Release, Explode, The Invincible (연소, 석방, 폭발, 대적할 이가 없는)

Burn, Release, Explode, The Invincible (연소, 석방, 폭발, 대적할 이가 없는)

Burn, Release, Explode, The Invincible (연소, 석방, 폭발, 대적할 이가 없는) – 4/10

Director Kim Su-hyun  (김수현) blends a variety of generic conventions within Burn, Release, Explode, The Invincible, merging drama, documentary, and experimental forms. The result is an odd tale about a woman with an androgynistic voice, who is in high demand for voice over work due to her authoritative yet soft vocal style. Her gift is also her curse however as the pressures surrounding her impact her mental stability. In terms of technique it’s a well-made film, yet the story is difficult to follow and the central protagonist hard to empathize with given the disparate conventions and non-linear storytelling. The finale is also quite odd as traditional Korean performances are introduced to express freedom. An interesting film, but also one that’s difficult to become immersed in.

Shibata and Nagao (시바타와 나가오)

Shibata and Nagao (시바타와 나가오)

Shibata and Nagao (시바타와 나가오) – 6/10

While his last film Breathless was a mesmerizing exploration of social class and the nature of violence, director Yang Ik-june (양익준) opts for a very different approach with romantic drama Shibata and Nagao. Filmed in Japanese, the film explores ex-lovers who meet again following a later break-up. Director Yang’s style is soft and tender as he examines the feelings that still exist between them, but it is also frustratingly slow-paced as very little information about them is revealed. There are some lovely moments that arise, as well as comedic – they discuss if a loud, violent couple are Korean – and it is thought-provoking in regards to unresolved/unrequited emotions. There’s a sense that there is a larger story not shown which is a shame. A lovely, yet slow-paced film.

Festival News Jeonju International Film Festival (제14회 전주국제영화제) Korean Festivals 2013 Reviews